Many of us visualize a happy baby calmly nursing in the crook of our arm when we think of breastfeeding or chestfeeding. While many of us do have quiet, hassle-free moments like these, most of us also discover that feeding our babies is far from easy, at least at first.

(Image credits to Canva)

Latching and placement, in particular, are difficult to master. It’s not always easy to figure out how to hold a baby exactly right to start them latching on — and then maintaining that grip and position during the nursing session. Finding a posture that works can sometimes require some trial and error.

It’s happened to all of us. It’s quite acceptable if you and your infant take some time to sort things out. After all, you’re both newbies! You may need to explore a few different nursing positions before settling on one that is most comfortable for both you and your baby. Read our list of top 9 breastfeeding positions you need to know to try out the one best for you.

#1 Reclined Position

The laidback breastfeeding posture, also known as biological nurturing, is typically the first option for new mothers. If your baby is placed on your chest or tummy as soon as he is born, he will automatically find his way to one of your breasts and try to latch on – this is known as the ‘breast crawl.’ Skin-to-skin contact stimulates his natural feeding instincts, while gravity aids in latching on and keeping him in position.

(Image credits to The Mauimama)

The laidback breastfeeding posture, also known as biological nurturing, is typically the first option for new mothers. If your baby is placed on your chest or tummy as soon as he is born, he will automatically find his way to one of your breasts and try to latch on – this is known as the ‘breast crawl.’ Skin-to-skin contact stimulates his natural feeding instincts, while gravity aids in latching on and keeping him in position.

#2 The Cradle Hold

This is the most common breastfeeding or chestfeeding posture, and it’s what most people visualize when they think of breastfeeding a baby. You need to sit up straight in a comfy chair with armrests for this position. Cradle your child so that their head is cuddled against your breast. Your baby’s head should be in line with the rest of his body, not twisted to one side. This is critical because not only will it make your baby uncomfortable, but it will also lead them to latch on to your breast incorrectly. Laying a pillow across your lap to provide extra support will make things easier for you and your child.

(Image credits to Ministry of Health NZ)

#3 Cross-Cradle Hold

The cross-cradle hold may be the greatest breastfeeding position for you and your newborn if you are a new parent and this is your first time breastfeeding. To begin, take a seat in a comfortable chair with armrests. Hold your baby in front of you, tummy to tummy, with their tummy against yours.

(Image credits to Pinterest)

#4 Side-lying Position

This is a posture that all new parents should master because it’s one of the finest ways to get rest — and you’ll need it while you’re breastfeeding all day and night!

(Image credits to Mount Elizabeth Hospital)

First, make sure there are no cushions or extra blankets on the area you’re feeding on. Lie on your side and place your baby on her side, tummy to tummy, so that they are near to you. As they begin to latch on, place her a bit below your breast. You can use a cushion to support your neck or back, and your free arm to hold your baby.

#5 Football hold

The football hold is a popular choice among parents who are dealing with twins. One baby will be on one side, and one will be around another. When your baby is in this position, a breastfeeding cushion can assist you to support them. It’s also helpful to have someone to hand you the infants.

(Image credits to Motherfigure)

#6 Upright

This breastfeeding posture is ideal for babies who are experiencing reflux. Support your child while making them sit upright, similar to the football hold, with the arm on the same side as the feeding breast and your free, opposite hand supporting your breast.

(Image credits to Mattos Lactation)

#7 Dangle feeding

Your baby rests on his back in this position, and you lean over him on all fours, hanging your nipple over his mouth. It is beneficial for mothers who have mastitis and do not want their breasts to be touched or pinched. This is something that mothers do for brief amounts of time and can be done while sitting or lying down. Use pillows to support your back and shoulders instead of hurting them.

(Image credits to Medela)

#8 Nursing in a sling

Breastfeeding your child in a carrier or sling is what this is all about. Nursing in a sling is really practical, and it lets you do some light housework at the same time. For newborns who can hold their heads up or are fully breastfed, this posture is optimal. There are several slings to pick from, but make sure your baby’s chin is not forced against his chest.

(Image credits to Oschaslings)

#9 ‘U’ Shaped Hold

This position is helpful for babies who have trouble latching due to premature delivery, sickness, or a condition like Down’s syndrome. This position aids in the support of both the baby’s head and your breast. Begin by cupping one side of your breast with your fingers and the other with your thumb. Adjust your thumb and index finger to form a ‘U’ shape in front of your breast. The breast should be supported by the remaining three fingers. As he sucks, your baby’s jaw will rest on your thumb and index finger. On both sides, your thumb and index finger will grip your baby’s cheeks. This position aids in providing your kid with a great deal of support.

(Image credits to Medela)

When it comes to making breastfeeding work for you and your baby, learning alternative breastfeeding or chestfeeding positions and methods can be a game-changer.  However, practicing these tactics on your own isn’t always enough, and having someone assist you in figuring out how to try certain positions, especially the first few times can be really beneficial.

Source – This article was written by HappyPreggie, published on November, 2021. Read the original article.